Thursday’s Sunset Daily News and Sports

Shrine Circus Bullhook Abuse.. The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin: Q&A with Filmmakers Nicholas and Dan Mross. Omar Garcia #SCtop10 Diving Catch. “We Have to Stop This Inequality”: Fast-Food Worker Strike Spreads to Dozens of Cities. Fast-Food CEOs Oppose Worker Raises Despite Making 1,200 Times More Money Than Average Employee. Debate: As FCC Votes on Internet’s Future, What’s the Best Way to Protect Net Neutrality? Walmart & Contractor Settles $21M Wage Theft Suit, Days After Obama Praises Penny-Pinching Retailer. ESPN Tennis: Get on Tour — Live from Rome. The Most Interesting Terp in the World. Horse Racing in 60 Seconds Flat.

“In the past, we’ve had the need for authority to make sure people stayed in the lines,” says Dan Mross, a subject in the new documentary The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin. “Bitcoin kind of encodes that into the software itself. So there’s not much to say against something that’s a cheap, proven, honest, transparent money system.”

Reason TV correspondent Naomi Brockwell caught up with Dan and his brother, Nicholas Mross, the movie’s director, at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. They discuss the challenges of making a film about an anonymous, online currency, the personalities behind bitcoin, the identity (or identities) of bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto, and the prospects for bitcoin’s future as money.

After witnessing behind-the-scenes abuse of elephants, this courageous 5-year-old is asking kids to skip the circus.

Thousands of fast-food workers in the United States and around the world are staging a one-day strike today to demand a livable wage. A recent report found fast food CEOs make 1,200 times as much as money as the average fast-food worker, a disparity that maximizes short-term profit while harming worker security and the overall economy. We are joined by the report’s author, Catherine Ruetschlin, a policy analyst at Demos; and by Terrance Wise, who has worked at Burger King for nine years and is striking today in Kansas City, his fourth such action since last August.

In a historic move, thousands of fast-food workers are staging a one-day-strike today in least 150 cities including St. Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Oakland, Detroit, Chicago, Los Angeles and New York. Organizers with Fast Food Forward say workers from 80 cities in more than 30 countries around the world will also join the day of action. The workers are demanding demand the right to organize and call for a doubling of their wages from the current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to $15 an hour. We hear voices from a protest in New York City outside a McDonald’s across the street from the Empire State Building.

Just days after President Obama praised Walmart’s business practices in a speech at one of its California stores, more than 1,800 warehouse workers in the state have settled a major wage theft lawsuit against one of the retail giant’s largest contractors. On Wednesday, workers at three California warehouses used by Walmart agreed to settle a wage theft lawsuit by accepting a $21 million settlement. The workers had sued Walmart and Schneider Logistics, an outside company that owned and ran the warehouses. Schneider will pay the entire settlement. The lawsuit alleged that workers were often paid less than minimum wage, with no required breaks or overtime compensation. We speak with attorney Theresa Traber, who represented the warehouse workers; and Demos policy analyst Catherine Ruetschlin.

“In the past, we’ve had the need for authority to make sure people stayed in the lines,” says Dan Mross, a subject in the new documentary The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin. “Bitcoin kind of encodes that into the software itself. So there’s not much to say against something that’s a cheap, proven, honest, transparent money system.”

Reason TV correspondent Naomi Brockwell caught up with Dan and his brother, Nicholas Mross, the movie’s director, at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. They discuss the challenges of making a film about an anonymous, online currency, the personalities behind bitcoin, the identity (or identities) of bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto, and the prospects for bitcoin’s future as money.

Approximately 8 minutes. Interview by Naomi Brockwell. Edited and Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Shot by Jim Epstein. Music: “Waltz into Moonlight” by Masco Hotel (http://www.jamendo.com/en/artist/340717/mascohotel-varios-artistas)

The Federal Communications Commission is voting today on new rules that may effectively abandon net neutrality, the concept of a free and open Internet. The FCC proposal would let Internet providers charge media companies extra fees to receive preferential treatment, such as faster speeds for their products and content. Under previous regulations struck down earlier this year, providers were forced to provide all content at equal speeds. Just steps from the vote, demonstrators have set up an “Occupy the FCC” encampment calling for federal regulators to reclassify broadband service as a public utility, which would allow for the requirement of net neutrality rules. The CEOs of 28 U.S. broadband providers and trade groups have asked the FCC not to classify broadband as a utility, arguing that regulating broadband would “impose great costs, allowing unprecedented government micromanagement of all aspects of the Internet economy.”

Omar Garcia of the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers makes an UNREAL #SCtop10 diving grab against the Quad Cities Bandits.

Coach Sasho Cirovski is The Most Interesting Terp in the World.

“Think B1G, my friends.”

Go behind the scenes in the horse-racing industry for just one minute and discover a culture of drugs, deception, and death.

ESPN Tennis: Get on Tour
ATP and WTA on ESPN
Live From Rome

Internazionali BNL D’Italia
May 12-18
Live on ESPN3 and WatchESPN

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